Toshiba Satellite P50t B-11D Review

Toshiba Satellite Review A combination of a terrific 4K display and Blu-ray drive make the P50t suitable for movie buffs seeking a solidly-built notebook. Whether you’ll get to the end of a film on that battery is another matter. As a touch 4K laptop, Toshiba Satellite P50T B-11D was expected to make an impact, visually at least. Toshiba call it the ‘world’s first 4K Ultra HD laptop’ and claim it delivers ‘true colour accuracy’, allowing you to see movies, photography and art as the artist intended. To back up that claim, they’ve crammed some solid hardware in there – but is it enough? And what can it really run? This is a very different sort of professional laptop, unlike Toshiba’s own no-nonsense Satellite Pro R50. Like Toshiba’s P55T, this is a statement piece and the price (£1200, about $1800 or AU$2400) reflects that. Toshiba’s stated aim is that this will be the laptop you buy to do high-end video-editing and photoshop work, in place of a Retina MacBook Pro (which, to even get near similar specifications, you’re looking almost double). Realistically, it’ll be bought by executives because it’s both expensive and shiny. Read more Source:Dan Grillopolous Image Source:Vernon...

Crucial BX100 1TB Review

Crucial BX100 1TB Not the best performing SSD around, but not the worst either, the BX100 is a great choice for anyone who wants an affordable SSD. The Crucial MX100 is a great SSD. When I covered it six months ago, it offered an unrivalled price per gigabyte, making the majority of other SSDs seem overly expensive, given the slim difference they offer in performance, for what in some cases amounts to paying twice the price. Until the MX100 arrived, you couldn’t buy a 512GB SSD for such a low price, least of all one which performed well too. It’s obviously proved popular, since Crucial has followed it up with two new models – the BX100 and MX200. The BX100 isn’t a radical departure from the MX100. Once again, it’s not trying to be the fastest drive on the market, something Crucial even says in its own marketing literature. But it’s similarly affordable, with roughly the same pricing as the MX100. Read more Source: Orestis Bastounis Image...

Google of antitrust violations for “abusing search dominance”

Google of antitrust violations The European Commission on Wednesday accused Google of antitrust violations, saying in a so-called statement of objections that the online giant has been using its position in Internet search to favor its own services. The European Union is charging Google with abusing its dominant position in search to promote the company’s other services. The EU has been investigating complaints that Google allegedly diverts traffic from rivals in favour of its own services for several years, and has grown increasingly exasperated at Google’s failure to offer significant remedies. Now it appears the EU is preparing to hit the search giant with a massive fine for antitrust breaches. Video About Google of antitrust violations Google will today be served with a statement of objections from the EU, focusing in particular on the undue prominence given to Google’s Shopping results. The EU will also open a formal investigation into whether Google has abused its position with the Android operating system. Google is by far and away the dominant search provider. Globally, Google accounts for around 62% of the desktop search market, according to NetMarketShare, and it accounts for around nine out of ten searches in the UK. Competitors in markets such as travel, shopping and rival search engines have complained that Google peverts its search results to give its own services an unfair advantage, depriving them of valuable traffic. Read more Source:Barry Collins Image...

2015: The Death of the Password

Death of the Password Talk about the “death of the password” has been going round for quite some time now. With technology advancing at such a rapid pace, and with passwords presenting numerous security issues, it is not surprising that alternatives to manually entering passwords are becoming popular. Rumours of the death of the password appear to have been greatly exaggerated in the past. But, dare we say it, it does look as if 2015 could be the year when tedious password-based log-in will be replaced by smart context-aware security solutions on mobile devices that know where a user is and whether their location, actions and biometrics (not just voice and fingerprint but ear biometrics and measuring the way you walk) match expected patterns. Only last month Microsoft threw its weight behind alternatives to passwords, blogging about plans to secure Windows 10 with authentication that could combine a traditional PIN with biometrics, such as a fingerprint, to allow the user to sign in to any supported mobile service. Android mobile makers have embraced fingerprint authentication for accessing the phone, while Apple’s Touch ID fingerprint identification feature authenticates access to Apple Pay and now the Apple Watch apps. Video About Death of the password Tech giants are responding to a groundswell of opinion that we are all getting sick of having to remember hundreds of passwords. The younger generation is driving this – 16 to 24 year old consumers in the UK have the greatest appetite for biometric security measures and the greatest need to use them in place of traditional authentication such as passwords – because they are simply...

Get a 480GB solid-state mSATA drive for $139.99

480GB solid-state mSATA Drive The ultimate upgrade for your Ultrabook or other ultra-slim laptop, this mini-SATA drive normally sells for at least $200. Plus: two bonus deals! If you splurged on an Ultrabook or any other pancake-height laptop in the last couple years, chances are good it came with not a lot of storage. My two-year-old Samsung, for example, has just 128GB — and I routinely bump into that low ceiling. Alas, upgrades tend to be pricey, as Ultrabook-friendly mSATA drives (which are tiny, “naked” versions of the enclosed SATA III drives you’re probably used to seeing) have been slower to reach mass production. Video About Crucial M500 480GB mSATA That’s why I’m particularly excited about today’s deal: Today only, and while supplies last, Amazon has the Crucial M500 480GB mSATA internal solid-state drive for $139.99 shipped. It lists for $259.99 and sells elsewhere for at least $200. (Price at Newegg, for example: $226.99.) For $139.99 you’d usually be lucky to score a 256GB drive. This? This is more.Nearly double, in fact. And for me, it would nearly quadruple the available storage in my Samsung, which is humming along just fine save for that one issue. Read more Source: Rick Broida Image Source:Robert...

The Acer Aspire R 13 has a premium feel and an impressive convertible hinge

Acer Aspire R 13 The 13.3-inch Aspire R 13 features a new take on Acer’s Ezel hinge, shifting the connection point from the back of the screen to the outside edges in a U-shaped frame. Like other PC manufacturers, Acer has been experimenting with the convertible Ultrabook form factor. That journey started with last year’s Aspire R7, a multimodal laptop with an easel stand and a 15-inch display that makes it look and feel more like a transforming all-in-one desktop than a convertible notebook. This year’s Aspire R13 shows Acer has been listening to user feedback in slimming its multimodal design. Video About Acer Aspire R 13 Starting at just $899 (£610, AU$1,170) with the latest Intel Broadwell processors and a 13-inch touchscreen display, the Acer Aspire R13 challenges convertibles including the Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro ($1,249, £850, AU$1,625), HP Spectre x360 ($1,149, £780, AU$1,495), and detachable 2-in-1s like the Surface Pro 3 ($799, £545, AU$1,040) and the Dell Venue 11 Pro 7000 series ($749, £510, AU$975). These convertibles offer users the flexibility of using at least two different form factors – tablet or notebook – and the 360-degree swiveling hinges of the Spectre x360 and Yoga 3 Pro allow these hybrids to offer additional usage modes that compete with the swiveling screen on the Aspire R13. Read more Source: Chuong Nguyen Image Source:Geraldin...