The core of Windows 10, unveiled

The core of Windows 10, unveiled

Windows 10

Microsoft’s Windows 10 event

Microsoft has left us with some big things to think about. It’s trying to safely move away from the failures of Windows 8 and Windows Phone, revamping the former and taking a new tack on the latter. But it’s also introduced some wild, futuristic, and much more risky concepts.

Windows 10

We got our first look at a bunch of features in Windows 10, which comes out next week for people who signed up for the pre-release. As expected, Microsoft made a strong push toward connecting its devices more seamlessly, part of its universal apps program. Office, Outlook, and other apps all work quite similarly across devices, and Cortana is everywhere, working as a natural-language interface and personal assistant. The big surprise, however, was Microsoft’s foray into virtual reality, with its HoloLens glasses, an ambitious bid to create a system for overlaying holographic images over the real world.

After the sea change that was Windows 8, Microsoft is still trying to make an operating system that will work on both mobile devices and PCs. Beyond purely visual changes like reworked desktop icons, Windows 10’s start menu will now expand to a full-screen view that looks like Windows 8.1’s home screen. A new Android-style Action Center provides quick access to Wi-Fi options, Bluetooth, and other settings — and the settings menus themselves should be cleaned up and easier to use. It’s another effort to keep the best features of desktop Windows while adapting to touchscreens. A new feature called Continuum, in fact, is designed specifically for convertible devices, switching almost instantly from a mouse and keyboard to a tablet screen. It obviously works pretty well on the stage, but so far, we haven’t seen more than early testing builds.

Video About Windows 10

Windows 8 was a desktop / tablet compromise, but Windows 10 is going even further: it’s for phones, too. There’s a build of it tailored to devices smaller than 8 inches, which reorganizes the interface to look a lot more like the old Windows Phone operating system. True to Microsoft’s unified vision, notifications will sync between PC and phone, and Microsoft-owned service Skype will integrate into the messaging app.

Read more

Source: Adi Robertson

Image Source: Jeremy Paton